If you've got an unsecured pool and have young visitors on the way, here are the few steps you can take to make sure everyone has a safe and fun visit with plenty of splashing and water-bound playtime. 

Pool Safety Tips When the Grandkids Come Visiting

According to the CDC, close to 700 children under the age of 14 drowned in pools each year between 2005 and 2009, and five times as many received emergency medical treatment after a near-drowning incident.

Those figures are scary and tragic, all the more so because proper pool safety equipment could have prevented many of these deaths. 

Families with children ought to have permanent pool-protective devices in place to ensure their kids safety and to make the pool a fun and secure place for their to come hang out, and in some neighborhoods certain pool safety precautions are required by law. For couples whose children have grown up and gone to have families of their own, these safety measures might be less of a concern most of the time, but that means extra care needs to be taken when you're entertaining your grandkids. 

If you've got an unsecured pool and have young visitors on the way, here are the few steps you can take to make sure everyone has a safe and fun visit with plenty of splashing and water-bound playtime. 

Purchase or Rent a Temporary Pool Fence

If you don't want the look or expense of a permanent fence around your pool area, you can purchase and often simply rent temporary fencing to achieve the same purpose. A number of companies can come and install temporary pool fencing for you, an DIY options are also available and relatively easy. There are also a variety of styles that can complement your backyard decor.

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that fences be at least four feet high, with a gate that is self-closing and self-latching to provide an effective barrier to young children.

Install Door, Window and/or Pool Gate Alarms

If you have an existing alarm system, you can often set it to sound only when a specific—such as the one leading to your backyard pool—is opened. This alert you to unsupervised youngsters attempting to slip away for a dip without your knowledge. For pools  that abut right up against your house, you might consider window alarms as well, or simple window guards to prevent pool-facing windows from opening to allow a child through.

There are also many affordable and easy-to-install arms available for the gate leading to your pool, which many homeowners find more convenient and less intrusive. Make sure the alarm is loud enough for you to hear inside the house, and in the room(s) farthest from the pool; an alarm isn't any good if you can't respond to it. 

Pool Alarms and Pool-Safe Behaviors Are the Best Option

Pool alarms can detect when the surface of the water is disturbed, and are one of the most effective ways to ensure greater pool safety. Simply turn the alarm off when you want to use the pool, and of course remember to turn it on (or set it to automatically come on after a certain time) when you leave.

Even better, maintaining proper pool safety behaviours—and teaching them to your grandkids—will help keep everyone safe. Kids shouldn't run by the pool or ever swim unsupervised, and any time you can't locate a child the pool should be the first place you look, not because they're likely to be there but because a few seconds can make a dramatic difference in a drowning incident. 

Keep these tips in mine, and you and your grandchildren will safely enjoy your pool every time they come around.

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